Show Agreement With Number 500 Crossword

The right definition is “bigotry”, and the pun explains itself, insinuated by the word “take” (since one word takes another): “apart” means APART and I`d is simply ID, so APART and ID “take” HE (which, in the cryptic use of crosswords, is a perfect synonym for “him”). The answer could be explained in the form of an APART identifier (HE). But Astle said anyone could try ergouts with a little knowledge of how they worked. I guess this issue will not be as well received by resolutions that are not as interested in pop culture as other topics. There are a whole series of names that you need to work out, and even if you can get them, you don`t need the parenthetical information in the clues to solve the riddle. Nevertheless, I thought it might be fun to take the phrase “six degrees of separation” and literally illustrate Kevin Bacon`s acting. After all, crossword puzzles are about finding connections. Enthusiasts have compiled a series of record hits in the New York Times and other venues. [40] Today`s puzzle has a pop culture theme with a few different elements.

Let`s start with the six actors and actresses with circled letters and some pretty long cross-references: in the 1920s, the crossword puzzle phenomenon began to attract attention. In October 1922, newspapers published a comic strip by Clare Briggs entitled “Movie of a Man Doing the Cross-Word Puzzle,” in which an enthusiast muttered: “87 across `Northern Sea Bird` !!??!?!!? Hm-m-m begins with an `M`, the second letter is `U`. I`ll look for all the words with an “M-U..” start. mus-musi-mur-murd – Hot Dog! This is it! Murre! [26] In 1923, a humorous squib at the Boston Globe had a wife who ordered her husband out and “save the newspapers.” The part I want is to blow in the street. “What is it that you want? “Crossword puzzles. Hurry up, please, he`s a good boy. [27] In the first issue of The New Yorker, published in 1925, the “Jottings About Town” section wrote: “Based on the number of triggers on the subway and `L` trains, the crossword proposes to become a fashion phenomenon among New Yorkers.” [28] In 1925, the New York Public Library reported that “the recent madness of meeting libraries is the crossword,” and complains that if “the puzzle `fans` disperses to dictionaries and encyclopedias to drive readers and students who need these books in their daily work, there may be doubt about the library`s duty, protect their legitimate readers? [29] Some puzzle grids contain more than one correct answer to the same set of clues…