German Adjective Agreement Table

For a native English speaker, it can be discouraging to think about how to finish an adjective before creating a sentence. After all, in English, if you have the adjective “old.” It remains “old” regardless of grammar and syntax. For example, you have in English: an old house, an old cat, an old dog and old houses/cats/dogs, old houses/cats/dogs, etc. In English, you don`t have to hurt the word “old.” Do yourself a great favor and take all these other diagrams (you may have given 3 separate diagrams only for adjectives and up to 7 others to cover the rest of the variations) and THROW THEM AWAY. Forget about her! They make your life much more difficult than it is. Knowing which declination model you are using is a huge step towards nailing the correct declination for your adjective (and of course also determining). The table gives an overview of the adjectives for the declination of German attribute adjectives. Do you see the no declination on “one” in nominative – accusative? And how should the adjective then take the (-s) strong declination? Note: The determinant and/or adjective in front of a nominal is called the “modification” (i.e. descriptive) of this nostantian. In the genitif, both the determinant (many) and the adjective (large) have strong declination. German students don`t just want to memorize German adjectives, but understand how it works. And once you understand, it`s very easy to learn piece by piece – if you use a good memory technique…

So what happens to German adjectives? A German adjective changes its ending according to the following factors: Why do we have to put -m, -n, -r, -s, -e on the ends of the adjectives? And how do we know which should be used when?! And adjectives are one of those types of words that come before the nouns! 4b. I see a man klein___. Here is a determining present: “one,” a word with an end >. In this case, we are in the male drums (the little man is the direct object of the verb “see”), > The adjective is -in: I see a little man.